Full Story Full Story







0

VIDEO SERIES: True Stories of the Connected

True Stories of the Connected: Rural Healthcare in Northern Canada

The Internet of Everything is connecting people, process, data and things every second of every day. In this episode of True Stories of the Connected, a Canadian doctor demonstrates the power of video and telehealth as he works to keep in contact with patients who are sometimes hundreds of miles away in a remote, tribal village. Amazing things happen when you connect the unconnected.


September 23 , 2013

Transcript (English):

JOHN PAWLOVICH

My name's Dr. John Pawlovich and I'm a primary care physician in the community of Takla Landing.

JOHN PAWLOVICH

It's quite a challenge to get there other than flying in.

TITLE CARD: Dr. John Pawlovich lives in Vancouver, more than 700 miles from Takla Landing.

JOHN PAWLOVICH

When I left on a Friday I might not see this person again for another 30 days or, or maybe longer. 

JOHN PAWLOVICH

Jessie, didn't you have some assignment due today?

JESSIE PAWLOVICH

Uh, yeah.

JOHN PAWLOVICH

You gonna get it done?

JESSIE PAWLOVICH

I'll do it on the weekend.

JESSIE PAWLOVICH

Okay.  Let's get out of here. I have to start seeing patients in half an hour.

JOHN PAWLOVICH

I never imagined I'd be doing what I'm doing now.  I trained in a kind of conventional way, went to a conventional medical school. 

Dr. Pawlovich interacts with a male patient via TELEHEALTH.

JOHN PAWLOVICH (in footage)

Frank I haven't seen you in a little while.  Any problem with the wound at all?

JESSIE PAWLOVICH

You get to see him more than we usually did when he went to the clinic. The patient reveals a large scar from a recent kidney operation.

JACOB

I probably won't become a doctor.  I get really queasy.

JOHN PAWLOVICH

Oh, that looks wonderful.

Dr. Polovich puts on headphones and listens to a female patient's heart.

JOHN PAWLOVICH

Good morning Takla.  How are you doing there?

JOHN PAWLOVICH

It allows me to listen to a patient's heart 1000 kilometers away and connect daily.  They've never had regular, reliable access to a physician like they have now.

DOCTOR PETER

My first impression of Telehealth was that I thought it was amazing.  I was taking all kinds of pictures to see how it worked.  I definitely thought I could give back to my home reserve to bring better health care to aboriginal people. 

JOHN PAWLOVICH

So Frank, how big are those fish in Silver Lake?

TITLE CARD: By 2020 the Internet of Everything has the potential to connect 50 BILLION people, processes, data and things.

JOHN PAWLOVICH

Telehealth is really just the beginning.  Imagine a future where the pills my patients take transmit their vitals directly to me.  Where I can monitor their pulse 24/7, sent from a device near their heart to the phone in my pocket.  Where I can call up a patient's entire health history, securely, from anywhere at anytime.

JOHN PAWLOVICH

It all comes back to the doctor patient relationship. The small bit of work we're doing in Takla represents something that's potentially much bigger.

TITLE CARD: People. Processes. Data. Things.  CONNECTED.  The Internet of Everything.

 

Related Tags: Video , Healthcare , Internet of Everything , True Stories of the Connected , Connected Canada

 
Web Content Display Web Content Display

Subscribe


Web Content Display Web Content Display

Stay Connected


Web Content Display Web Content Display

The Network is offering Google Translate in an effort to more easily share our content with a global audience. As these are free, machine translations, we cannot verify that all translations are accurate.

Translate


Web Content Display Web Content Display

Web Content Display Web Content Display
img
Web Content Display Web Content Display